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DESTINATIONS
Saba

Saba:  The Ultimate
Caribbean Hideaway

You can truly get away from it all at this tropical island paradise.
TRAVEL REVIEWS
Travel - Hogwarts Castle - Universal Studios - The Travel Information Company

Pure Magic

Harry Potter's world comes to life at Universal Studios Islands of Adventure.
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Travel - American Samoa

American Samoa

American Samoa offers its visitors coral reefs, tropical rainforests, rugged cliffs, and glistening beaches.
TRAVEL REVIEWS
National WWI Museum and Liberty Memorial

National WWI Museum

This highly interactive museum in Kansas City honors those who defended liberty in "The Great War".
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Yellowstone Lamar Valley - American Serengeti

Lamar Valley

Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park provides unequaled opportunities for wildlife viewing.
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Travel - Old San Juan - Puerto Rico - The Travel Information Company

Old San Juan

Old San Juan is the oldest city under the U.S. flag, but is also young at heart.
 

 

 

TRAVEL TIPS & VACATION IDEAS
 
 
 
 
 

Mysteries of Stonehenge

by Jennifer Santiago

In a field near Salisbury, the enormous rocks of Stonehenge stand towering and proud among a cluster of hills. But what is this UNESCO World Heritage site—a calendar? temple? the work of Merlin? Everyone circling the monument on its grayish-brown, fine, dust trail had traveled for different reasons, joining me for pictures, for the chance to stand before a great icon of the world, out of an appreciation for antiquity, out of religious beliefs, or out of belief in the site’s mystical healing powers. Kings, legends, and Middle Age tourists have felt the same as modern visitors in awe of the atypical Neolithic monument.

In the Details

People that visit 221B Baker Street are almost guaranteed to return with a new appreciation for the adventures of Holmes and Watson, no matter how much was known about the stories before entering.

Place de la Republique—Paris, France

by Jen Windland

It seems that everywhere we go, there is constant construction happening. Such was the case this summer when I visited Paris. The Crowne Plaza Hotel where I stayed was nestled in the bustling Place de la Republique, and through my window, I had an amazing view of the city. I felt very much like Eloise, running around the Plaza hotel (but without her mischief in my eyes).

The Royal Mile

by Jen Windland

Scotland is most often known for kilts and haggis, sometimes together. We saw plenty of kilts and ate many meals of haggis in Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. Located in the southern regions of the country, Edinburgh is home to some shared history with England and many shared monarchs over the years. Since King James IV, first of Scotland and then of England, reigned over the island, the city has grown in size and population. The history has grown from the highlanders through Queen Elizabeth the first through the Jacobites and to today, where the Scots are still ruled by the Parliament of London.

A Page to Adore: Time and Art at the British Library

by Jennifer Santiago

The British Library is a wonder of England I’d sadly underestimated in the past. I really only knew it housed the Magna Carta, the manuscript of “Beowulf”, and would have a special exhibit including the manuscript of a Sherlock Holmes story. I’d missed this stop entirely on my first trip to England.

My class went the morning of our arrival, fresh off the plane. Sherlock Holmes had been a part of our studies due to our visit to the museum, so everyone found it important to make the exhibit, which would be in its final day.

The Cathedral of Christ the Redeemer

by Jennifer Santiago

The Cathedral of Christ the Redeemer is an impressive monument that reminds viewers of tsar style and influence. In reality, the monument is about 13 years old. The original was once destroyed in hopes of creating an enormous tower devoted to socialism. This did not work, and the land was turned into a community pool. Fortunately, though this provides a unique and odd history to the area and a perspective on the changes of times, the cathedral was rebuilt, remembering and returning its beauty, history, and culture.

Dublin, the Largest City in Ireland

by Jen Windland

Population-wise, Dublin has more than 1.5 million people. This makes it the largest county in Ireland, and in that respect, it felt just like home. For a girl visiting Ireland from the big city of Philadelphia, it had an old-world feel and a big-city mentality all wrapped together in a sweet little package. Like a Christmas gift, complete with a bow on top.

Giants in Ireland

by Jen Windland

In the North, where the Irish can look across the pond to see the Scottish, there is a place where giants dwelled. Or at least, that’s how the legend goes.

Finn MacCool was one such giant. He, being an Irish giant, was the nicest of giants. Finn lived with his wife and child at what we now call The Giant’s Causeway, on the coast of Northern Ireland. Legend says that Finn was challenged to a fight with a Scottish giant named Benandonner, and in order to meet with the Scot there needed to be a way across the ocean.

Galway: Ireland’s Cultural Heart

by Jen Windland

When we arrived in Galway, Ireland, it was pouring rain—not exactly the entrance we had hoped for. I’ll admit that even though I knew it would be irritating for the locals, I wanted to walk down the street and dance to the chorus of “Galway Girl”. Clearly, I have seen “P.S. I Love You” a few too many times.

The first impression I received of the city was wet but, as with all places in Ireland, the people were severely gracious. We were three wet, frustrated Americans crashing into our hotel and they had warm friendly smiles for us when we blustered up to the desk.

What is there to do in Cork?

by Jen Windland

So what is there to do in Cork, other than go to church and shop? Ever hear of the Blarney Stone, that big ol’ rock you’re supposed to kiss when you get to Ireland?

Upon arrival in Cork, Ireland, you will step out of the train station and straight into the general—albeit stereotypical—idea of what an Irish city looks like. Gone are the busy streets of Dublin, along with the noise and the populace. It’s pretty much Heaven on earth.

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